Creating An Educational Podcast

Podcasts are more popular than ever, but there’s still not much understanding about how to produce them. The good news is that podcasting isn’t as complicated as it once was, and with a few simple steps, you can create an engaging and educational podcast for your audience.

What is podcasting?

Podcasting is a way for you to share audio and video content. With podcasting, you can produce content in a variety of ways, including:

  • Audio podcasts. These are podcasts that contain primarily spoken words and music.
  • Video podcasts. These include both pictures and text, similar to web videos or professionally-produced YouTube videos.

Podcasts can be listened to on a wide range of devices, including smartphones, tablets, computers, and other systems with compatible software installed on them (such as iTunes). If you have an Apple computer or device (e.g., iPhone or iPad), you’re likely familiar with the podcast app called iTunes—this is one example of such software!

You can also share your podcast using social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook so that others can access it. Furthermore, some people do this by embedding links within their posts, so others see what they’re talking about immediately without going anywhere else (like the “Listen Now” buttons do). Other options include posting links directly into forums where people with similar interests can gather around an issue of topical significance.

Why podcast?

A podcast is a great way to get your message out. It’s free, easy to produce and distribute, and it has the ability to reach a broad audience.

It’s also an excellent way for academics looking to engage with their audience in new ways — not just as an expert in their field but as someone who cares about the same things that students want from university: more opportunities for meaningful learning experiences and more chances themselves engage with new ideas, perspectives, and cultures.

Podcasting allows you to share your knowledge with potential students and peers without having them physically present in class or a lecture hall.

Equipment

Microphone

Before you get started, you need to make sure that your microphone does not sound bad. If your listeners can’t hear you clearly or if they can hear any background noises, then they won’t come back for more episodes. So how do you choose the right microphone?

There are two main types of microphones: dynamic and condenser. Dynamic mics are usually cheaper than condenser mics and are better suited for loud environments like live performances or podcasts where many people will be speaking at once. They also tend to be less sensitive so that they don’t pick up as much background noise—they’re great for podcasting in busy cafes or restaurants! A good dynamic microphone is the Creators Blue Yeti mic from Logitech

Condenser mics are usually more expensive than dynamic mics, but they are more sensitive and pick up less background noise. They’re best suited for quiet environments like recording studios or one-on-one interviews where there isn’t much background noise or other people speaking at once. An affordable option is the Audio-Technica Condenser Studio Microphone.

Audio-Technica AT2035PK...
HyperX QuadCast - USB...
Logitech for Creators...
MAONO XLR Condenser...
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Amazon Prime
Amazon Prime
Amazon Prime
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Audio-Technica AT2035PK...
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HyperX QuadCast - USB...
Amazon Prime
Logitech for Creators...
Logitech for Creators...
Amazon Prime
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MAONO XLR Condenser...
Amazon Prime

Computer

Choosing the right computer for a podcast can be tricky. It’s not just about having the best hardware but also about knowing what software you’re going to need. First, let’s talk about hardware. You’ll want something that’s easy to use and has a lot of space on it. If you’re recording multiple people at once, you’ll need room so that they can all talk at once without getting cut off by the computer.

You’ll also want something that can handle multiple tracks—this means you can have music playing while someone else is talking at the same time. Finally, look for something that has an HDMI port so you can plug in an external microphone and connect it directly to your computer. Now let’s talk about software! The main thing here is that you need something easy for people who aren’t tech-savvy or don’t know much about computers in general (like me). We’ll go over some of my favorite options next…

Lenovo IdeaPad 3 14...
ASUS Vivobook Laptop,...
Apple 2022 MacBook Air...
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Apple 2022 MacBook Air...
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Lenovo IdeaPad 3 14...
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ASUS Vivobook Laptop,...
Apple 2022 MacBook Air...
Apple 2022 MacBook Air...
  • Audio software (for recording and editing)

The first step is deciding whether you want to record and edit the audio yourself or hire someone else to do it for you. If you plan to make your podcast yourself, then you’ll need software that helps you record, edit and publish your podcast. If you want your podcast to sound professional, then it’s important that the recording software has some kind of noise-reduction function.

This will help reduce background noise in the room where you’re recording so that only your voice is audible when listening on headphones or speakers at home or in other quiet environments. Recorders usually come in the form of stand-alone applications that can be used to record audio files directly onto your computer’s hard drive. If you want to create your own podcast, you will need to use this type of software. The best recorder for you will depend on what kind of equipment you have available—and how much money you want to spend on it! You’ll also need some kind of editing function if you want to edit out any mistakes or dead air from the recording process before publishing the final product.

There are a lot of options out there for recording and editing audio, but we think that Audacity is the best one for academics. It’s free, it’s easy to use, and it has a lot of features that will make your podcast sound professional. Here are some of the reasons we recommend Audacity: -It’s affordable! You can download Audacity for free from their website . They also have a donation page if you’d like to support their work on the project.

  • It’s easy to learn and use! Most people will be able to figure out how to record and edit their podcasts with this tool after just a few minutes of instruction.
  • It has lots of features! Some of the things that make Audacity great are: multitrack editing, LADSPA effects, pitch correction, fade in/out effects (like fade in), noise removal tools (for removing unwanted sounds from your recordings), support for VST plugins (third-party tool)

A useful audio-enhancing software known as adobe podcast is now in beta and is completely free.

Headphones

Headphones are an essential piece of equipment for any podcaster. You want to be able to listen to yourself while talking, so you can hear if there’s any background noise or if your voice sounds too low or too high. And if you’re interviewing someone else, you’ll need a microphone that works with their headphones so that they can hear themselves as well as your questions, which will help them answer more clearly.

There are two kinds of headphones: wired and wireless. Wired headphones connect directly to your device using a cord that plugs into the headphone jack, while wireless ones connect using Bluetooth technology or another type of wireless connection.

Both kinds have advantages and disadvantages: wired headphones can’t get tangled up in cords when they’re not being used (or worse—when they accidentally fall off your head!), but they are less convenient since they require charging every few hours; wireless options don’t suffer from this issue but may not always work as well as their corded counterparts due to interference from other devices nearby (like other wireless headphones).

OneOdio Over Ear...
Shure SRH440A Over-Ear...
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Over Ear Headphone, Wired...
OneOdio Wired Over Ear...
OneOdio Wired Over Ear...

Uploading/hosting software (to get it online)

If you’re going to do anything beyond just one episode, you’ll need to use a platform like Libsyn or Buzzsprout. These platforms are free up until a certain number of downloads per month, after which they charge a fee.

A small fee ($5-$10 per month) may seem expensive, but these sites have many more features than just hosting audio files: they can help you promote your show by embedding links into episodes; build an audience by integrating social media sharing buttons within each episode page; and allow listeners to subscribe via RSS feed so that new episodes can automatically appear in their podcast app of choice.

Where to record

When it comes to recording your podcast, you want to record in a quiet room. Sounds obvious, right? But you might be surprised by how many podcasts are recorded in noisy spaces.

So what is meant by a “quiet room”? A quiet room is one where there are no distracting noises or sounds (e.g., air conditioners or fans) that could interfere with the recording. If you do not have access to such a space, try using other strategies listed below.

If you’re using an external microphone, make sure it’s plugged into the correct input on your computer and that the input level is set appropriately in whatever software you’re using (see Recording tips).

Also, investing in a good set of acoustic panels will improve soundproofing of your recording space.

52 Pack Acoustic Panels 1...
24 Pack-12 x 12 x 2...
TroyStudio Thick Acoustic...
ATS Acoustics Panel...
52 Pack Acoustic Panels 1...
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TroyStudio Thick Acoustic...
ATS Acoustics Panel...
52 Pack Acoustic Panels 1...
52 Pack Acoustic Panels 1...
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24 Pack-12 x 12 x 2...
TroyStudio Thick Acoustic...
TroyStudio Thick Acoustic...
ATS Acoustics Panel...
ATS Acoustics Panel...

Creativity and Structure

To be creative, you have to have a structure. You can’t just go with the flow and hope it works out well; instead, you need to plan ahead, so your podcast doesn’t end up sounding like a jumbled mess. This means using a theme, format or template for each episode. For example:

  • A theme might be “how-to podcasts of academics” or “podcasting best practices.”
  • A format could be interviews with other academics or faculty members about their experiences in academia (i.e., an interview show). Or maybe you prefer having conversations over Skype? In that case, choose a simple but effective way of connecting with people via voice-over IP technology—and then adhere to this plan consistently throughout each episode of your podcast series!
  • A template is basically just any kind of prewritten set of steps for creating something (a report on research results or anything else). Remember that when it comes down to how long each section should be in relation to another section (i.e., introduction vs. conclusion), there are no concrete rules here either; however, I would recommend keeping things relatively short and sweet, so listeners don’t become bored during certain parts while they’re listening!

The benefits of producing podcasts as an academic.

It may seem counterintuitive, but podcasting can help you improve your communication skills. With the right equipment and a little practice, anyone can put together a podcast with ease. The best part is that once you’ve recorded it and uploaded it to the internet—which takes only a few minutes—you can share it with anyone at any time.

In addition to improving your communication skills, podcasting is also an excellent way of building an audience for yourself professionally. Whether you’re hoping to get promoted within your current organization or simply want to grow your network professionally, creating niche podcasts targeted at specific groups of people will help you achieve those goals. By making yourself known in the industry as someone who provides valuable information about topics explicitly related to their career interests.

Gain some inspiration from these endocrinology podcasts.

Conclusion

Podcasting is a great way to communicate with an audience. It’s also a great tool for developing your own personal brand as well as improving your career as an academic. We hope that we have shown you how easy it is to get started with podcasting and given some tips on how to improve your production.

The opinions expressed here represent the views of a practicing hormone specialist (endocrinologist) and must not substitute the advice of your health care provider. This blog post is written for a non-medical audience interested in learning more about hormonal disorders. The author has no commercial conflicts of interest to declare. Also, read our privacy policy.

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Last update on 2024-05-10 at 07:55 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

About the Author MyEndoConsult

The MyEndoconsult Team. A group of physicians dedicated to endocrinology and internal medicine education.

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